Highlights of the Dales (part 2)

Well what can I say? If you’ve not been already (and if your local to Yorkshire I’m sure you will have) you have to try The Wharfe View Tea Room in Burnsall Bridge for lunch or snacks when out on the bike. The ladies there are super friendly and they do a big range of cakes and snacks as well as, what shall we say, more hearty fair. I thought about an all day breakfast before plumping for the gammon. Fanbloodytastic and filling too 😀

Not fancy or la di da just good old fashioned lunch time grub, washed down with a lovely cup of milky coffee, properly hot from the pan, unlike a bloody latte from Costa or Starbucks! Burnsall Bridge is a must visit destination in summer when there are loads of families enjoying the sun by the crook on the river, however as today showed, it’s just as good in winter too, provided the rain holds off.

Having already taken in the tops at Langbar and passed through Bolton Abbey for the obligatory photo call above the Abbey and river, I decided to head back via Appletreewick and Skyreholme and it’s views towards Simon’s Seat, bypassing the 20 mph zone that is Grassington in favour of the twisty and exposed road towards Greenhow Hill and back down to the A59 for the spin into Harrogate.

All in about 2hrs 30mins on a cool yet dry day. As ever at this time of year the roads never seem fully dry especially under the tree line and in dips however provided you kept your eyes peeled for the inevitable patches of gravel and mud on the smaller roads, actually a rather fun and uplifting day’s riding was there to be had. And yes, I busted through the 800 miles limit opening up the next layer of fun from the increasingly charming Street Triple. Accelerating hard up to 8,000 rpm and snicking swiftly through the gears courtesy of the quick shifter helps to understand the true performance potential of the Triumph.

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#triumph #yorkshire #dales #boltonabbey

Highlights of the Dales (part 1)

I didn’t really have any destination in mind when I set out on the Street Triple just after lunch time; my objectives being simply to complete the next phase of running in (get past 800 miles) and to clear my head. The official running in schedule calls for <7,000 rpm between 600-800 miles and at 770 miles at the start of the day I simply needed to unlock the 8,000 rpm limit on the little Triumph charger.

Well the ride so far succeeds on both fronts taking in Norwood, Otley, Langbar, Bolton Abbey and now Burnsall Bridge where I decided to grab some scran stopping at the Wharfe View Tea Room for gammon, egg, pineapple and chips, washed down with a ‘milky coffee’. For those younger than 40, that’s what Latte was called before Starbucks except the milk is heated in a pan then added to instant coffee. 😂

I’m starting to get really comfortable now with the bike and my cornering and slow speed maneouvering has really improved so it’s fitting that I start to do a few pleasure trips in my adopted homeland of North Yorkshire.

I don’t have a vast experience of different bikes and obviously would love to try the Fireblade and R1 at some point however all in all its hard to imagine many other bikes being quite as versatile and as much fun as the little (?) 675R which simple loves to eat up the miles. (to be continued shortly)

Read Highlights of the Dales (part 2) now

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#triumph #cafe #caferacer #yorkshire

2016 Street Triple R – 5 Week Review

It’s been 5 weeks now since the “Striple” was delivered in a van by the very polite gentleman from Cobb and Jagger in Shipley. Tom (that’s what the kids christened the bike, although coincidentally also the name of the polite guy from C&J from memory – no connection 😂) has certainly seen some decent action in those first few weeks. Around 650 miles so far of the required running in period and as the bike passes through the various milestones, and the permitted rev range has increased, it has really grown in stature (and fun) exponentially.

In hindsight its rather like a Xmas present to myself, only one with several troublesome layers of wrapping which its taken me several weeks to remove. As I’m now over the 600 miles point the bike is allowed to rev to 7,000 rpm, still only roughly half of the 14k redline however it’s full potential is eventually beginning to be revealed. To be honest at no stage on this journey did the bike ever feel lacking for performance; even when restricted to 5,000 rpm it was quick away from the lights and felt genuinely punchy through the gears.

In hindsight, and my wife made this point very directly to me just now, it’s been a good thing. Unlike the Ducati which came with 5,000 miles on the clock and therefore was completely ready to roll hard from day 1, the Triumph has required patience and has returned the favour in kind. As a relatively inexperienced rider I’ve never felt the bike was too much for me, in fact I’d go so far as to say the bike would make a very credible learner motorcycle for those aiming for the UK direct access test. It is lightweight, agile, has a low centre of gravity and a motor which is incredibly forgiving. It will run from 20 mph in 6th without angst or protestation and yet still has enormous power further up the rev range whenever it is needed.

I’ve found myself riding along most often in either 4th or 6th, depending on the road and cruising speed and the in gear acceleration in both is effortless. This makes overtaking slower traffic a breeze, you just kind of waft past with the manoeuvre being over almost before it has begun. This gives you the confidence to get past slower moving traffic without any prevarication. The brakes are excellent too meaning that once you’ve overtaken you can quickly scrub off any excess speed and tuck the bike into the next bend with ease.

Obviously it’s only been 5 weeks and there’s still a layer or two of wrapping paper to go, however I know I’m already sold on the incredible strengths of the Triumph. The highlight of the first month had to be retracing the route of the first stage of the Tour De France from 2014, including the beautiful pass of Buttertubs, North of Hawes. A fantastic ride on a cool yet sunny day in Yorkshire (see below).

img_20161028_165250-copy

So, do I have any grumbles so far?

Well not really – if anything the exhaust note sounds a little flat (ok anything sounds a little flat when compared to a Ducati V-Twin with Termignoni’s) – in hindsight maybe I should have spent some of my £600 accessories allowance on the Arrow end can, however at the end of the day this is my day to day bike, not a race replica. It sounds plenty good enough under acceleration and revs all day long, putting on speed with ease. The only other minor irritation has been the paint on the cap ring over the fuel tank. It flaked / chipped within days of me taking possession requiring the decent folks at Triumph West Yorkshire to replace it at the first service under warranty, only for me to then scuff / chip that replacement today when putting petrol in by briefly allowing the petrol hose to rest on it while filling – grrrrr!

And that’s it, literally nothing else disappointing to note so far. Watch out for my next review once the gloves really do come off at 1,000 miles and I get to press the redline a little harder.

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#triumph #streettriple #motorbikes #sportbikes